Expositions au CEFE

   guyane2

© Aurélien Brusini 

« La biodiversité cachée des sols des forêts tropicales humides » par Thibaud Decaëns.

Cette exposition présente une sélection de photos illustrant la diversité des écosystèmes guyanais et des organismes qui peuplent leurs sols. L’accent est mis sur des groupes de macro-invertébrés qui, malgré les fonctions écologiques essentielles qu’ils remplissent, restent encore trop largement méconnus tant d’un point de vue taxonomique qu’écologique.

Lire la suite : Expositions au CEFE

Planète Collemboles, la vie secrète des sols

Planète collemboles, la vie secrète des sols

 

 

Jérôme Cortet & Philippe Lebeaux

Biotope eds (Mèze), 2015

Lire la suite : Planète Collemboles, la vie secrète des sols

Conférence de Jacques Blondel

camargue

 Le CLAS de Montpellier vous invite :
 
Conférence de Jacques Blondel
« Une histoire naturelle et humaine de la Camargue »
Jeudi 25 février 2016, 12h30
Amphithéâtre de la délégation CNRS route de Mende, bâtiment D
 

Lire la suite : Conférence de Jacques Blondel

"Special seminar on Stewardship, Place attachment & Metaphors of human/Environment relationships"

Location: Maison des Sciences de l’Homme de Montpellier, salle du bas

Date: February 11th, 9h30-12h00

Organizers: Antenne montpelliéraine de NSS-Dialogues  

Funding: MAGIC project

Lire la suite : "Special seminar on Stewardship, Place attachment & Metaphors of human/Environment relationships"

Evolution and diversity of papillomaviruses: codon usage bias and phenotypic presentation of the infection

Ignacio Bravo

MIVEGEC (Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs : Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution et Contrôle), Montpellier Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

 

ATTENTION: En raison des mesures de restriction d’accès au Campus Triolet, les personnes extérieures à l’Université de Montpellier doivent venir munies de: AFFICHE IMPRIMÉE + UNE PIECE D'IDENTITÉ.

Le vendredi 19 février 2016 - Bât 22, Salle Louis Thaler de l'ISEM - 11h30

One in five human cancers is liked to an infection, essentially by papillomaviruses, hepatitis viruses or Helicobacter pylori. Papillomaviruses (PVs) are small dsDNA viruses and display large genotypic diversity. Virtually all amniotes are the hosts to a large number of PVs, and virtually all individuals are infected by several PVs from very early in life. The phenotypic manifestations of PV infections are also very diverse, as most infections are asymptomatic, some of them cause ugly but benign very productive lesions, and only very few persistent infections eventually lead to a cancer. Despite considerable research and findings in the basic and medical biology of PVs in the last 30 years, our knowledge on their origin and evolution is still scarce and based rather on tacit assumptions than on scientifically tested/testable hypothesis based on real data. PVs are thus regarded to be static, evolving very slowly, and making it unnecessary to incorporate viral evolution into our biological, medical and epidemiological models. I have very recently joined the evolutionary research community at Montpellier, and I want to explicitly challenge this static view with the research programme I would like to develop here. In this talk I will (briefly) present some basics of PV diversity and evolution and I will focus on the match between codon usage preferences in PVs on the one hand and the phenotypic manifestations of the viral infection on the other, linking these findings with the editing activity of C>T mammalian APOBEC3 internal mutators on viral genomes.

Bravo IG and Félez-Sánchez M. Papillomaviruses: viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine. Evol Med Public Health. 2015 Jan 28;2015(1):32-51.

Garcia-Perez, R, Ibanez C, Godinez JM, Arechiga N, Garin I, Perez-Suarez G, de Paz O, Juste J, Echevarria JE, Bravo IG. Novel papillomaviruses in free-ranging Iberian bats: no virus-host co-evolution, no strict host specificity and hints for recombination. Genome Biol Evol (2014) 6(1):94-104.

 

Contact Karen McCoy; Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser. 

 Contact du Comité SEEM: Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser..   Contact du Labex CEMEB: Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.,  www.labex-cemeb.org.

Workshop Epigenetics in Ecology and Evolution

Comparative methods without phylogeny: Estimation of macroevolutionary rates from the fossil record

Daniele Silvestro

University of Lausanne, Switzerland 

(in English)

ATTENTION: En raison des mesures de restriction d’accès au Campus Triolet, les personnes extérieures à l’Université de Montpellier doivent venir munies de: AFFICHE IMPRIMÉE + UNE PIECE D'IDENTITÉ.

Le vendredi 12 février 2016 - Bât 22, Salle Louis Thaler de l'ISEM - 11h30

Phylogenetic comparative methods have progressed very rapidly in recent years and substantially improved our understanding of macroevolutionary processes, such as the tempo and mode of speciation, extinction, migration, and phenotypic diversification. These methods rely on dated phylogenies, which are mostly restricted to extant species. Since present biodiversity only represents a small fraction of the organisms that have ever lived, inferring evolutionary dynamics exclusively from extant taxa may have limited power. Here, I present PyRate, a suite of quantitative methods to analyze fossil data and infer macroevolutionary processes, in the absence of an explicit phylogenetic hypothesis. Paleontological data, despite their inevitable incompleteness, can be analyzed in this framework to reliably infer speciation and extinction rates and their temporal trends. Using case studies from plant and animal clades I demonstrate the power of the method to detect trait-based diversification, selectivity in mass extinction events, and clade competition through diversity dependence. Building upon this framework, a new dispersal-extinction-sampling model is developed to tackle other key aspects in macroevolution, namely the spatial dynamics and historical biogeography of taxa. Analyses of simulated and empirical data show that fossil-based estimates outperform those obtained from phylogenies of extant taxa. Thus, quantitative analyses of fossil data can provide important insights into macroevolutionary processes.

Recent publications:

Silvestro D., Antonelli A., Salamin N. & Quental T.B. (2015) The role of competition in evolutionary replacements of North American canids. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 112: 8684–8689.

Silvestro D., Cascales-Miñana B., Bacon C.D. & Antonelli A. (2015) Revisiting the origin and diversification of vascular plants through a comprehensive Bayesian analysis of the fossil record. New Phytologist 207: 425–436.

Silvestro D., Schnitzler J., Liow L.H., Antonelli A. & Salamin N. (2014) Bayesian estimation of speciation and extinction from incomplete fossil occurrence data. Systematic Biology 63: 349–367.

 

 

Contact: Fabien Condamine; Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.

 

Contact du Comité SEEM: Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser..   Contact du Labex CEMEB: Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.,  www.labex-cemeb.org.