Archives SEEM

Dale H. Clayton    

Unviversity of Utah, USA

Le vendredi 16 décembre 2016 - 11h30 Grande Salle CEFE (1919 Rte de Mende, 1e étage, aille C)

(Seminar in English)

Coevolutionary biologists have successfully demonstrated coadaptation of species in response to reciprocal selective forces exerted between those species.  In contrast, few studies have tested the influence of coadaptation on diversification (including speciation) of one or both of the interacting groups.  Ectoparasites, such as feather lice, are powerful models for studies of coadaptive diversification because they are unusually tractable for work in both micro- and macro-evolutionary time.  I will present recent work from our lab testing the influence of reciprocal selection on the diversification of feather lice, including the experimental evolution of body size, color, microhabitat use, and reproductive isolation.

Recent publications:

Clayton, D. H., S. E. Bush and K. P. Johnson. 2016. Coevolution of life on hosts: integrating ecology and history. University of Chicago Press. 294 pp.

Knutie, S. A., J. P. Owen, S. M. McNew, A. W. Bartlow, E. Arriero, J. M. Herman, E. Diblasi, M. Thompson, J. A. H. Koop and D. H. Clayton. 2016. Galápagos mockingbirds are tolerant hosts of introduced parasites that threaten Darwin’s finches.  Ecology 97:940-950

Harbison, C. W. and D. H. Clayton. 2011. Community interactions govern host-switching with implications for host-parasite coevolutionary history. PNAS 108: 9525-9529.

 

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